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May 27, 2019

The 7 Fundamentals to Create and Sustain a Successful Knowledge Sharing Organization: A collection of valuable findings from an Aerospace Industry Case Study

As digital business strategies continue to evolve, corporate leaders and information system professionals are attempting to develop a successful workforce knowledge sharing system designed to enhance employee collaboration, innovation, and productivity in today’s fluctuating, multigenerational environment.

The 7 Fundamentals to Create and Sustain a Successful Knowledge Sharing Organization reports findings discovered through a case study of a multinational corporation, referred to as Aerospace Inc., specializing in the design, manufacture, and delivery of aerospace products.  This case study explores an internally developed social networking tool used by Aerospace Inc. to deliver online collaboration capabilities to employees globally.  As a result, seven vital components were identified to create and sustain a successful knowledge sharing organization.

Sharing knowledge and learning are social activities. Dr. Patricia Pedraza-Nafziger shows how the combination of sound KM fundamentals and social media will improve the exchange of knowledge to accelerate learning. Leaders are provided with practical examples of what is needed to drive engagement across generations. The 7 Fundamentals to Create and Sustain a Successful Knowledge Sharing Organization provides a wake-up call for smart leaders to leverage and grow their experts while retaining young talent.

Cindy Hubert, Executive Director of Client Solutions, American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC), and Author of The New Edge in Knowledge: How KM is Changing the Way We Do Business

Patricia leads the reader into a forest of issues associated with workforce social networking, and out the other side, to knowledge sharing benefits that can shine on a corporation if these seven fundamentals are addressed; she accomplishes this using candid inputs from actual practitioners.” 

— Tim Bridges, former Knowledge Management Executive, and Contributing Author to Project Management Institute and Harvard Business Review.